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"Antigone" is one of the world-renowned tragedies by the ancient Greek playwright Sophocles, written around 441 BC. Belonging to 'Theban Plays', a category of 3 plays about Thebes's fate during the reign of king Oedipus, the play deals with the theme of civil disobedience, fidelity and human wisdom. Although it was written before Sophocles' other two Theban plays, chronologically it comes after the stories in "Oedipus Rex" and "Oedipus at Colonus", and it picks up where Aeschylus' play "Seven Against Thebes" ends.

The action of this play follows on from the Theban civil war, in which the two brothers, Eteocles and Polynices, died fighting each other for the throne of Thebes after Eteocles had refused to give up the crown to his brother as their father Oedipus had prescribed. Creon, the new ruler of Thebes, has declared that Eteocles is to be honoured and Polynices is to be disgraced by leaving his body unburied on the battlefield (a harsh and shameful punishment at the time). The play begins with the counter-declaration of Antigone, sister of both the brothers, that she will disobey the rule that is unjust full and will do the same death rituals for her both brothers.